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Saturday, June 27, 2020

How to Download FM Whatsapp Free Latest Version2020


FM Whatsapp




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Download FM Whatsapp:



Open this lonk and you will get "How to Download FM Whatsapp".
WhatsApp is one of the most well-known communication platforms ever and has a lot of clients and downloaders across the globe. Because of this, it has a variety of mods and knock-off apps. The APK designers come up with multiple features the original is missing and adding it to a modded version of the app for everyone to use. FMWhatsApp -- Fouad WhatsApp is only among the many, but before I tell you more, do know that you can find out more mods in Whats Mod APKs.


Watch Video Tutorial here:






Friday, June 26, 2020

Allergy Symptoms || Types,Causes,Treatment


Allergy Symptoms:

Allergy symptoms, which depend on the substance involved, can affect your airways, sinuses and nasal passages, skin, and digestive system. Allergic reactions can range from mild to severe. In some severe cases, allergies can trigger a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis.

Main Allergy Symptoms are:

  • Sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  • Itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  • Wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  • A raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  • Swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  • Tummy pain, feeling sick, vomiting or diarrhea
  • Dry, red and cracked skin

Your immune system is responsible for defending the body against bacteria and viruses. In some cases, your immune system will defend against substances that typically don’t pose a threat to the human body. These substances are known as allergens, and when your body reacts to them, it causes an allergic reaction.
You can inhale, eat, and touch allergens that cause a reaction. Doctors can also use allergens to diagnose allergies and can even inject them into your body as a form of treatment.

Allergy Symptoms || Types,Causes,Treatment
Allergy Symptoms || Types,Causes,Treatment
                     

                

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) reports that as many as 50 million people in the United States suffer from some type of allergic disease.

What causes an allergic reaction?

Doctors don’t know why some people experience allergies. Allergies appear to run in families and can be inherited. If you have a close family member who has allergies, you’re at greater risk for developing allergies.
Although the reasons why allergies develop aren’t known, there are some substances that commonly cause an allergic reaction. People who have allergies are typically allergic to one or more of the following:

  • Pet dander
  • Bee stings or bites from other insects
  • Certain foods, including nuts or shellfish
  • Certain medications, such as penicillin or aspirin
  • Certain plants
  • Pollen or molds


What are the symptoms of an allergic reaction?

The symptoms of an allergic reaction can vary from mild to severe. If you become exposed to an allergen for the first time, your symptoms may be mild. These symptoms may get worse if you repeatedly come into contact with the allergen.
Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:


  • Hives (itchy red spots on the skin)
  • Itching
  • Nasal congestion (known as rhinitis)
  • Rash
  • Scratchy throat
  • Watery or itchy eyes
  • Severe allergic reactions can cause the following symptoms:
  • Abdominal cramping or pain
  • Pain or tightness in the chest
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Dizziness (vertigo)
  • Fear or anxiety
  • Flushing of the face
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Heart palpitations
  • Swelling of the face, eyes, or tongue
  • Weakness
  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Unconsciousness


A severe and sudden allergic reaction can develop within seconds after exposure to an allergen. This type of reaction is known as anaphylaxis and results in life-threatening symptoms, including swelling of the airway, inability to breathe, and a sudden and severe drop in blood pressure.

Types of Allergies and their Causes:

A food allergy can cause:
  • Tingling in the mouth
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue, face or throat
  • Hives
  • Anaphylaxis

An insect sting allergy can cause:
  • A large area of swelling (edema) at the sting site
  • Itching or hives all over the body
  • Cough, chest tightness, wheezing or shortness of breath
  • Anaphylaxis

A drug allergy can cause:
  • Hives
  • Itchy skin
  • Rash
  • Facial swelling
  • Wheezing
  • Anaphylaxis

Atopic dermatitis, an allergic skin condition also called eczema, can cause skin to:
  • Itch
  • Redden
  • Flake or peel
  • Anaphylaxis

Symptoms of anaphylaxis:

Some types of allergies, including allergies to foods and insect stings, can trigger a severe reaction known as anaphylaxis. A life-threatening medical emergency, anaphylaxis can cause you to go into shock.

Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • A drop in blood pressure
  • Severe shortness of breath
  • Skin rash
  • Lightheadedness
  • A rapid, weak pulse
  • Nausea and vomiting


Common allergy triggers include:

Airborne allergens, such as pollen, animal dander, dust mites and mold
Certain foods, particularly peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, eggs and milk
Insect stings, such as from a bee or wasp
Medications, particularly penicillin or penicillin-based antibiotics
Latex or other substances you touch, which can cause allergic skin reactions

Risk factors:

You might be more likely to develop an allergy if you:

  • Have a family history of asthma or allergies, such as hay fever, hives or eczema
  • Are a child
  • Have asthma or another allergic condition

Complications:

Having an allergy increases your risk of certain other medical problems, including:


  • Anaphylaxis: If you have severe allergies, you're at increased risk of this serious allergy-induced reaction. Foods, medications and insect stings are the most common triggers of anaphylaxis. 

  • Asthma: If you have an allergy, you're more likely to have asthma — an immune system reaction that affects the airways and breathing. In many cases, asthma is triggered by exposure to an allergen in the environment (allergy-induced asthma). 

  • Sinusitis and infections of the ears or lungs: Your risk of getting these conditions is higher if you have hay fever or asthma.



Prevention:

Preventing allergic reactions depends on the type of allergy you have. General measures include the following:

Avoid known triggers: Even if you're treating your allergy symptoms, try to avoid triggers. If, for instance, you're allergic to pollen, stay inside with windows and doors closed when pollen is high. If you're allergic to dust mites, dust and vacuum and wash bedding often.

Keep a diary: When trying to identify what causes or worsens your allergic symptoms, track your activities and what you eat, when symptoms occur and what seems to help. This may help you and your doctor identify triggers.

Wear a medical alert bracelet: If you've had a severe allergic reaction, a medical alert bracelet (or necklace) lets others know that you have a serious allergy in case you have a reaction and you're unable to communicate.

Diagnosis:

To evaluate whether you have an allergy, your doctor will likely:
  • Ask detailed questions about signs and symptoms
  • Perform a physical exam
  • Have you keep a detailed diary of symptoms and possible triggers

If you have a food allergy, your doctor will likely:

  • Ask you to keep a detailed diary of the foods you eat
  • Ask if you've stopped eating the suspected food during the allergy evaluation
  • Your doctor might also recommend one or both of the following tests. However, be aware that these allergy tests can be falsely positive or falsely negative.


Skin test: A doctor or nurse will prick your skin and expose you to small amounts of the proteins found in potential allergens. If you're allergic, you'll likely develop a raised bump (hive) at the test location on your skin.

A skin test is most valuable for diagnosing:

  • Food allergy (like shellfish or peanuts)
  • Mold, pollen, and animal dander allergy
  • Penicillin allergy
  • Venom allergy (such as mosquito bites or bee stings)
  • Allergic contact dermatitis (a rash you get from touching a substance)


Blood test: Specific IGE  blood testing, commonly called radioallergosorbent test (RAST) or  Immunocap testing, measures the amount of allergy-causing antibodies in your bloodstream, known as immunoglobulin E (IGE) antibodies. A blood sample is sent to a medical laboratory, where it can be tested for evidence of sensitivity to possible allergens.
A blood test for an allergy checks your blood for antibodies against a possible allergen. An antibody is a protein your body produces to fight harmful substances. Blood tests are an option when skin testing isn’t helpful or possible.

Allergy treatments include:

Allergen avoidance: Your doctor will help you take steps to identify and avoid your allergy triggers. This is generally the most important step in preventing allergic reactions and reducing symptoms.

Medications: Depending on your allergy, medications can help reduce your immune system reaction and ease symptoms. Your doctor might suggest over-the-counter or prescription medication in the form of pills or liquid, nasal sprays, or eyedrops.

Immunotherapy: For severe allergies or allergies not completely relieved by other treatment, your doctor might recommend allergen immunotherapy. This treatment involves a series of injections of purified allergen extracts, usually given over a period of a few years.

Another form of immunotherapy is a tablet that's placed under the tongue (sublingual) until it dissolves. Sublingual drugs are used to treat some pollen allergies.

Emergency epinephrine: If you have a severe allergy, you might need to carry an emergency epinephrine shot at all times. Given for severe allergic reactions, an epinephrine shot (Auvi-Q, EpiPen, others) can reduce symptoms until you get emergency treatment

Some allergy symptoms improve with home treatment.

Sinus congestion and hay fever symptoms: These often improve with saline nasal irrigation — rinsing out the sinuses with a salt and water solution. You can use a neti pot or a specially designed squeeze bottle to flush out thickened mucus and irritants from your nose. However, improper use of a neti pot or other device can lead to infection.

Household airborne allergy symptoms: Reduce your exposure to dust mites or pet dander by frequently washing bedding and stuffed toys in hot water, maintaining low humidity, regularly using a vacuum with a fine filter such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter and replacing carpeting with hard flooring.

Mold allergy symptoms: Reduce moisture in damp areas, such as your bath and kitchen, by using ventilation fans and dehumidifiers. Fix leaks inside and outside your home







Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Qualitative and Quantitative Research


Qualitative and  Quantitative Research


Qualitative Research and Quantitative research both are important for gaining different kinds of knowledge.
When collecting and analyzing data, quantitative research deals with numbers and statistics but Qualitative Research deals with words and meanings 

Qualitative and  Quantitative Research
                                  
                               
Qualitative Research:

Qualitative Research is expressed in words. It is used to understand concepts, thoughts or experiences. This type of research enables you to gather in-depth insights on topics that are not well understood.
Common Qualitative methods include interviews with open-ended questions, observations described in words, and literature reviews that explore concepts and theories. Qualitative Research is multimethod in focus, involving an interpretive, naturalistic approach to its subject matter. This means that Qualitative Researchers study things in their natural settings, attempting to make sense of, or interpret, phenomena in terms of the meanings people bring to them.
The aim of Qualitative Research is to understand the social reality of individuals, groups and cultures as nearly as possible as its participants feel it or live it. Thus, people and groups, are studied in their natural setting.

Quantitative research:

Quantitative research is expressed in numbers and graphs. It is used to test or confirm theories and assumptions. This type of research can be used to establish generalizable facts about a topic.
Common quantitative methods include experiments, observations recorded as numbers, and surveys with closed-ended questions. Quantitative data is information about quantities, and therefore numbers, and Qualitative data is descriptive, and regards phenomenon which can be observed but not measured, such as language.

The differences between quantitative and Qualitative Research
Quantitative and Qualitative Research use different research methods to collect and analyze data, and they allow you to answer different kinds of research questions.

Qualitative vs. quantitative research:   
                
Qualitative Research
Quantitative research    
Focuses on exploring ideas and formulating a theory or
hypothesis
Focuses on testing theories and hypotheses 
Analyzed by summarizing, categorizing and interpreting
Analyzed through math and statistical analysis        
Mainly expressed in words
Mainly expressed in numbers, graphs and tables
Requires few respondents
Requires many respondents
Open-ended questions
Closed (multiple choice) questions
Key terms: understanding, context, complexity, subjectivity
Key terms: testing, measurement, objectivity, replicability   
                                   
Data collection methods:

Quantitative and Qualitative data can be collected using various methods. It is important to use a data collection method that will help answer your research question(s).
Many data collection methods can be either Qualitative or quantitative. For example, in surveys, observations or case studies, your data can be represented as numbers (e.g. using rating scales or counting frequencies) or as words (e.g. with open-ended questions or descriptions of what you observe).

Qualitative data collection methods:

Interviews: Asking open-ended questions verbally to respondents.
Focus groups: Discussion among a group of people about a topic to gather opinions that can be used for further research.
Ethnography: Participating in a community or organization for an extended period of time to closely observe culture and behavior.
Literature review: Survey of published works by other authors.

Quantitative data collection methods:

Surveys: List of closed or multiple choice questions that is distributed to a sample (online, in person, or over the phone).
Experiments: Situation in which variables are controlled and manipulated to establish cause-and-effect relationships.
Observations: Observing subjects in a natural environment where variables can’t be controlled.

Professional editors proofread and edit your paper by focusing on:

  • Academic style
  • Vague sentences
  • Grammar
  • Style consistency


Data Analysis

Qualitative Research is endlessly creative and interpretive. The researcher does not just leave the field with mountains of empirical data and then easily write up his or her findings.
Qualitative interpretations are constructed, and various techniques can be used to make sense of the data, such as content analysis, grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967), thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) or discourse analysis.


When to use Qualitative or Quantitative research:

A rule of thumb for deciding whether to use Qualitative or quantitative data is:

Use quantitative research if you want to confirm or test something (a theory or hypothesis)
Use Qualitative Research if you want to understand something (concepts, thoughts, experiences)
For most research topics you can choose a Qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods approach. Which type you choose depends on, among other things, whether you’re taking an inductive vs. deductive research approach; your research question(s); whether you’re doing experimental, correlational, or descriptive research; and practical considerations such as time, money, availability of data, and access to respondents.

Key Features:

Events can be understood adequately only if they are seen in context. Therefore, a Qualitative Researcher immerses her/himself in the field, in natural surroundings. The contexts of inquiry are not contrived; they are natural. Nothing is predefined or taken for granted.

1-For Qualitative Reasearcher:

Qualitative Researchers want those who are studied to speak for themselves, to provide their perspectives in words and other actions. Therefore, Qualitative Research is an interactive process in which the persons studied teach the researcher about their lives.
The Qualitative Researcher is an integral part of the data, without the active participation of the researcher, no data exists.
The design of the study evolves during the research, and can be adjusted or changed as it progresses.
For the Qualitative Researcher, there is no single reality, it is subjective and exist only in reference to the observer.
Theory is data driven, and emerges as part of the research process, evolving from the data as they are collected.
Limitations:
Because of the time and costs involved, Qualitative designs do not generally draw samples from large-scale data sets.

The problem of adequate validity or reliability is a major criticism. Because of the subjective nature of Qualitative data and its origin in single contexts, it is difficult to apply conventional standards of reliability and validity.
Strengths:
Because of close researcher involvement, the researcher gains an insider's view of the field. This allows the researcher to find issues that are often missed (such as subtleties and complexities) by the scientific, more positivistic inquiries.

Qualitative descriptions can play the important role of suggesting possible relationships, causes, effects and dynamic processes.

Qualitative analysis allows for ambiguities/contradictions in the data, which are a reflection of social reality (Denscombe, 2010).

Qualitative Research uses a descriptive, narrative style; this research might be of particular benefit to the practitioner as she or he could turn to Qualitative reports in order to examine forms of knowledge that might otherwise be unavailable, thereby gaining new insight.

2-For Quantitative Researcher:

Quantitative researchers try to control extraneous variables by conducting their studies in the lab.
The research aims for objectivity (i.e., without bias), and is separated from the data.
The design of the study is determined before it begins.
For the quantitative researcher reality is objective and exist separately to the researcher, and is capable of being seen by anyone.
Research is used to test a theory and ultimately support or reject it.
Limitations:
Context: Quantitative experiments do not take place in natural settings. In addition, they do not allow participants to explain their choices or the meaning of the questions may have for those participants (Carr, 1994).

Researcher expertise: Poor knowledge of the application of statistical analysis may negatively affect analysis and subsequent interpretation (Black, 1999).

Variability of data quantity: Large sample sizes are needed for more accurate analysis. Small scale quantitative studies may be less reliable because of the low quantity of data (Denscombe, 2010). This also affects the ability to generalize study findings to wider populations.

Confirmation bias: The researcher might miss observing phenomena because of focus on theory or hypothesis testing rather than on the theory of hypothesis generation.
Strengths:
Scientific objectivity: Quantitative data can be interpreted with statistical analysis, and since statistics are based on the principles of mathematics, the quantitative approach is viewed as scientifically objective, and rational (Carr, 1994; Denscombe, 2010).


Useful for testing and validating already constructed theories.

Rapid analysis: Sophisticated software removes much of the need for prolonged data analysis, especially with large volumes of data involved (Antonius, 2003).

Replication: Quantitative data is based on measured values and can be checked by others because numerical data is less open to ambiguities of interpretation.

Hypotheses can also be tested because of the used of statistical analysis (Antonius, 2003)


Research Question:

How satisfied are students with their studies?
Quantitative research approach
You survey 300 students at your university and ask them questions such as: “on a scale from 1-5, how satisfied are your with your professors?”

You can perform statistical analysis on the data and draw conclusions such as: “on average students rated their professors 4.4”.

Qualitative Research approach
You conduct in-depth interviews with 15 students and ask them open-ended questions such as: “How satisfied are you with your studies?”, “What is the most positive aspect of your study program?” and “What can be done to improve the study program?”

Based on the answers you get you can ask follow-up questions to clarify things. You transcribe all interviews using transcription software and try to find commonalities and patterns.

Mixed methods approach
You conduct interviews to find out how satisfied students are with their studies. Through open-ended questions you learn things you never thought about before and gain new insights. Later, you use a survey to test these insights on a larger scale.

It’s also possible to start with a survey to find out the overall trends, followed by interviews to better understand the reasons behind the trends.

How to analyze Qualitative and quantitative data:

Qualitative or quantitative data by itself can’t prove or demonstrate anything, but has to be analyzed to show its meaning in relation to the research questions. The method of analysis differs for each type of data.

Analyzing quantitative data:

Quantitative data is based on numbers. Simple math or more advanced statistical analysis is used to discover commonalities or patterns in the data. The results are often reported in graphs and tables.

Applications such as Excel, SPSS, or R can be used to calculate things like:

  • Average scores
  • The number of times a particular answer was given
  • The correlation or causation between two or more variables
  • The reliability and validity of the results


Analyzing Qualitative data:

Qualitative data is more difficult to analyze than quantitative data. It consists of text, images or videos instead of numbers.

Some common approaches to analyzing Qualitative data include:

Qualitative content analysis: Tracking the occurrence, position and meaning of words or phrases
Thematic analysis: Closely examining the data to identify the main themes and patterns
Discourse analysis: Studying how communication works in social contexts


Breast cancer | Symptoms and causes


Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer  is cancer that forms in the cells of the breasts.

After skin cancer,  is the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States.  can occur in both men and women, but it's far more common in women.


Breast cancer | Symptoms and causes 
                                  
                           
Substantial support for  awareness and research funding has helped created advances in the diagnosis and treatment of .  survival rates have increased, and the number of deaths associated with this disease is steadily declining, largely due to factors such as earlier detection, a new personalized approach to treatment and a better understanding of the disease.

Types:

Inflamtory Breast cancer
Male Breast cancer
Signs and symptoms of breast cancer may include:

  • A breast lump or thickening that feels different from the surrounding tissue
  • Change in the size, shape or appearance of a breast
  • Changes to the skin over the breast, such as dimpling
  • A newly inverted nipple
  • Peeling, scaling, crusting or flaking of the pigmented area of skin surrounding the nipple (areola) or breast skin
  • Redness or pitting of the skin over your breast, like the skin of an orange


When to see a doctor

If you find a lump or other change in your breast — even if a recent mammogram was normal — make an appointment with your doctor for prompt evaluation.

Causes

Doctors know that  occurs when some breast cells begin to grow abnormally. These cells divide more rapidly than healthy cells do and continue to accumulate, forming a lump or mass. Cells may spread (metastasize) through your breast to your lymph nodes or to other parts of your body.

 most often begins with cells in the milk-producing ducts (invasive ductal carcinoma).  may also begin in the glandular tissue called lobules (invasive lobular carcinoma) or in other cells or tissue within the breast.

Researchers have identified hormonal, lifestyle and environmental factors that may increase your risk of . But it's not clear why some people who have no risk factors develop cancer, yet other people with risk factors never do. It's likely that  is caused by a complex interaction of your genetic makeup and your environment.

Inherited breast cancer:

Doctors estimate that about 5 to 10 percent of s are linked to gene mutations passed through generations of a family.

A number of inherited mutated genes that can increase the likelihood of breast cancer have been identified. The most well-known are  gene 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer gene 2 (BRCA2), both of which significantly increase the risk of both breast and ovarian cancer.

If you have a strong family history of breast cancer or other cancers, your doctor may recommend a blood test to help identify specific mutations in BRCA or other genes that are being passed through your family.

Consider asking your doctor for a referral to a genetic counselor, who can review your family health history. A genetic counselor can also discuss the benefits, risks and limitations of genetic testing to assist you with shared decision-making.

Risk factors:

A breast cancer risk factor is anything that makes it more likely you'll get breast cancer. But having one or even several breast cancer risk factors doesn't necessarily mean you'll develop breast cancer. Many women who develop breast cancer have no known risk factors other than simply being women.

Factors that are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer include:

  • Being female. Women are much more likely than men are to develop breast cancer.
  • Increasing age. Your risk of breast cancer increases as you age.
  • A personal history of breast conditions. If you've had a breast biopsy that found lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) or atypical hyperplasia of the breast, you have an increased risk of breast cancer.
  • A personal history of breast cancer. If you've had breast cancer in one breast, you have an increased risk of developing cancer in the other breast.
  • A family history of breast cancer. If your mother, sister or daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer, particularly at a young age, your risk of breast cancer is increased. Still, the majority of people diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history of the disease.
  • Inherited genes that increase cancer risk. Certain gene mutations that increase the risk of breast cancer can be passed from parents to children. The most well-known gene mutations are referred to as BRCA1 and BRCA2. These genes can greatly increase your risk of breast cancer and other cancers, but they don't make cancer inevitable.
  • Radiation exposure. If you received radiation treatments to your chest as a child or young adult, your risk of breast cancer is increased.
  • Obesity. Being obese increases your risk of breast cancer.
  • Beginning your period at a younger age. Beginning your period before age 12 increases your risk of breast cancer.
  • Beginning menopause at an older age. If you began menopause at an older age, you're more likely to develop breast cancer.
  • Having your first child at an older age. Women who give birth to their first child after age 30 may have an increased risk of breast cancer.
  • Having never been pregnant. Women who have never been pregnant have a greater risk of breast cancer than do women who have had one or more pregnancies.
  • Postmenopausal hormone therapy. Women who take hormone therapy medications that combine estrogen and progesterone to treat the signs and symptoms of menopause have an increased risk of breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer decreases when women stop taking these medications.
  • Drinking alcohol. Drinking alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer.


Prevention:

1-Breast cancer risk reduction for women with an average risk

Making changes in your daily life may help reduce your risk of breast cancer. Try to: 

  • Ask your doctor about breast cancer screening. Discuss with your doctor when to begin breast cancer screening exams and tests, such as clinical breast exams and mammograms.
  •  
  • Talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of screening. Together, you can decide what breast cancer screening strategies are right for you.
  •  
  • Become familiar with your breasts through breast self-exam for breast awareness. Women may choose to become familiar with their breasts by occasionally inspecting their breasts during a breast self-exam for breast awareness. If there is a new change, lumps or other unusual signs in your breasts, talk to your doctor promptly.
  •  
  • Breast awareness can't prevent , but it may help you to better understand the normal changes that your breasts undergo and identify any unusual signs and symptoms.
  •  
  • Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink to no more than one drink a day, if you choose to drink.
  • Exercise most days of the week. Aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise on most days of the week. If you haven't been active lately, ask your doctor whether it's OK and start slowly.
  • Limit postmenopausal hormone therapy. Combination hormone therapy may increase the risk of breast cancer. Talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of hormone therapy.
  •  
  • Some women experience bothersome signs and symptoms during menopause and, for these women, the increased risk of breast cancer may be acceptable in order to relieve menopause signs and symptoms.
  •  
  • To reduce the risk of breast cancer, use the lowest dose of hormone therapy possible for the shortest amount of time.
  •  
  • Maintain a healthy weight. If your weight is healthy, work to maintain that weight. If you need to lose weight, ask your doctor about healthy strategies to accomplish this. Reduce the number of calories you eat each day and slowly increase the amount of exercise.
  • Choose a healthy diet. Women who eat a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil and mixed nuts may have a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat.


 2-Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk


  • If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such as a precancerous breast condition, that increase your risk of breast cancer, you may discuss options to reduce your risk, such as:
  •  
  • Preventive medications (chemoprevention). Estrogen-blocking medications, such as selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors, reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with a high risk of the disease.
  •  
  • These medications carry a risk of side effects, so doctors reserve these medications for women who have a very high risk of breast cancer. Discuss the benefits and risks with your doctor.
  •  
  • Preventive surgery. Women with a very high risk of breast cancer may choose to have their healthy breasts surgically removed (prophylactic mastectomy). They may also choose to have their healthy ovaries removed (prophylactic oophorectomy) to reduce the risk of both breast cancer and ovarian cancer